Pieces of a Man is Mick Jenkins’ second studio album coming after the Healing Component and numerous mix tapes, most notably his breakout mix tape The Water[s]. Pieces of a Man came out two years after Mick broke into the limelight with The Water[s] and due to this “lengthy” gap between the two projects some of the hype around him died down, and this album wasn’t as widely received or successful as the prior mix tape; However, this does not mean this project is worse or not comparable by any means. Pieces of a Man is a beautifully complex piece that one will need to sit down with and spend some time on if they wish to grasp any part of its eccentric wordplay, message, themes, and overall beauty. The album starts with a monologue , slam-poetry style, titled “Heron Flow” where Jenkins talks about and pays homage to Gil-Scott Heron’s Dot dot dit dit dot dot dash meaning “damned if I know”. He uses this phrase to explain how the “black man” is damned if he knows what he has a grip on and what he controls. He further explains how they are damned to know this because this is becoming less and less the case, and that one should err on the side of caution by preparing for the worst. He continues this monologue in a later track title “Heron Flow 2” where he touches on people judging the whole of a man by his pieces and how he publicly presents himself, rather than considering the man behind the curtain. He further articulates how the man is more damned if he doesn’t find out why he can’t climb out of the poor situations they previously thought they had control of. This is a key theme throughout the entire album, and Jenkins does a great job at delivering poetic and conscious thoughts and ideas throughout each of his songs. Jenkins showcases his ability and talent to deliver these thoughtful lyrics through a variety of ways. From his gritty and deep piece “Gwendolyyn’s Apprehension”, to his soft singing on “Soft Porn”, and even to his more aggressively styled track “Padded Locks”, this album flows seamlessly and really showcases the mastery Jenkins has of his penmanship. The songs are incredibly easy to get into and you’ll find more depth and layers to each track the more you play them. I would rate this album a 4.8/5 for these reasons. This album could easily be considered a classic if Jenkins was a more household and influential name in the industry, but I don’t think that should take away any credit from the quality work he has put out. Criticism is hard to find on this album, and asking for anything more would be borderline voracious. This album offers essentially everything you could want in a jazzy, rap album and should satiate the needs of any such fans.

Pieces of a Man is Mick Jenkins’ second studio album coming after the Healing Component and numerous mix tapes, most notably his breakout mix tape The Water[s]. Pieces of a Man came out two years after Mick broke into the limelight with The Water[s] and due to this “lengthy” gap between the two projects some of the hype around him died down, and this album wasn’t as widely received or successful as the prior mix tape; However, this does not mean this project is worse or not comparable by any means. Pieces of a Man is a beautifully complex piece that one will need to sit down with and spend some time on if they wish to grasp any part of its eccentric wordplay, message, themes, and overall beauty. The album starts with a monologue , slam-poetry style, titled “Heron Flow” where Jenkins talks about and pays homage to Gil-Scott Heron’s Dot dot dit dit dot dot dash meaning “damned if I know”. He uses this phrase to explain how the “black man” is damned if he knows what he has a grip on and what he controls. He further explains how they are damned to know this because this is becoming less and less the case, and that one should err on the side of caution by preparing for the worst. He continues this monologue in a later track title “Heron Flow 2” where he touches on people judging the whole of a man by his pieces and how he publicly presents himself, rather than considering the man behind the curtain. He further articulates how the man is more damned if he doesn’t find out why he can’t climb out of the poor situations they previously thought they had control of. This is a key theme throughout the entire album, and Jenkins does a great job at delivering poetic and conscious thoughts and ideas throughout each of his songs. Jenkins showcases his ability and talent to deliver these thoughtful lyrics through a variety of ways. From his gritty and deep piece “Gwendolyyn’s Apprehension”, to his soft singing on “Soft Porn”, and even to his more aggressively styled track “Padded Locks”, this album flows seamlessly and really showcases the mastery Jenkins has of his penmanship. The songs are incredibly easy to get into and you’ll find more depth and layers to each track the more you play them. I would rate this album a 4.8/5 for these reasons. This album could easily be considered a classic if Jenkins was a more household and influential name in the industry, but I don’t think that should take away any credit from the quality work he has put out. Criticism is hard to find on this album, and asking for anything more would be borderline voracious. This album offers essentially everything you could want in a jazzy, rap album and should satiate the needs of any such fans.

Notable Tracks: “Gwendolynn’s Apprehension”, “Understood”, “Soft Porn”, “Consensual Seduction”